University of Iowa

Special Sessions

Eighth International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM8)

"Lowering Risk by Increasing Resilience"

The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
August 17 - 19, 2020


 

Proposed and coordinated by: Sandra Knight, WaterWonks LLC, Washington, DC, USA. Email: sandra@water-wonks.com

The Flood Apex Program, funded by the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate, is wrapping up a 5-yr $25 million program aimed at applying new and emerging technologies to improve community resilience from flood disasters.  The session will provide an overview of the program and highlight innovative science and technology products.  Specific S&T presentations will cover new methods for remote sensing to identify historical observed flooding, low-cost sensor technologies, the inclusion of tsunami modeling into HAZUS, using supercomputing and AI to develop a national structures inventory and the atmospheric drivers of extreme floods.

Proposed and coordinated by: Giorgio Rossatti, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento, Italy Email: giorgio.rosatti@unitn.it 

In mountain regions, the term “flood” must be considered in a broad sense, and it commonly includes phenomena like flash floods, landslides and, most of all, debris flows. Therefore, in these regions flood risk acquires features quite different from the “classical” riverine cases. The session wants to give room to the many aspects that concerns flood risk management in mountain regions. Papers concerning modelling (phenomena and damage), back analyses, tools and methods for hazard and risk mapping, prevention, protection and mitigation works/strategies and other related topics are welcomed.

Proposed & coordinated by: Toshio Koike,  International Flood Initiative, International Center for Water Hazard and Risk Management, Tsukuba,  Japan. Email: koike@icharm.org

The number of hydrological and meteorological disasters is increasing rapidly all over the world by more than three times during the past forty years in both developed and developing countries. Human factors that increase exposure and vulnerability, such as poverty, rapid population growth, disorderly urbanization and changes in land use together with effects of climate change on weather patterns with increased extreme events, aggravate the negative consequences of flood hazards. Floods derail sustainable development, particularly in developing countries. Consequently, the need to embed flood disaster risk reduction into sustainable development goals is paramount. This special session focuses on the scientific and technological approaches of flood risk reduction.

Proposed and coordinated by: Brian Skahill, Research Hydrologic Engineer at U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), Portland, OR, USA. Email: Brian.E.Skahill@usace.army.mil

USACE Civil Works R&D for the Flood Risk Management, Planning, and Dam and Levee Safety programs includes tools and methodology advancements, studies, and knowledge transfer activities. Key deliverables to date which have leveraged recent advances in hydrologic science and engineering include the RMC-BestFit software, an RMC/ERDC-CHL collaboration to enhance and expedite flood hazard assessments, RMC directed Bulletin 17C training, CHL research, development, and application of entropy methods for flow frequency, HEC development of a stochastic weather generator, HEC/CHL collaboration to advance calibration capabilities of the HEC-HMS, and CHL directed studies applying stochastic processes for the spatial analysis of hydrometeorological extremes.

Proposed and coordinated by: Alastair Barnett, HYDRA Software, Waikato, New Zealand. Email: barncon@xtra.co.nz

Contributions should offer model validations based on observed and tested datasets, exercising aspects of a wide range of flood models.  Datasets observed at full field scale are preferred, but laboratory measurements of fully turbulent flow in physical models do have the advantage of closer control of the generation of testing events. Such datasets should include evidence of quality assurance of the data collection methods, preferably by demonstrating a close match with model solutions that may be reproduced independently by others.

Proposed and coordinated by: Daniela Molinari and Francesco Ballio, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy. Emails: daniela.molinari@polimi.it, francesco.ballio@polimi.it

With the shift from “hazard control” to “flood risk management” policies, modelling of flood damage became a key component of flood risk assessment, as the knowledge base for the implementation of efficient risk mitigation strategies. Nevertheless, availability and reliability of comprehensive flood damage data (to improve knowledge on damage mechanisms) is still a matter of concern; likewise, despite the perceived abundance of models to predict expected flood damage, no model can be at present considered as a standard and, for some exposed elements, prediction tools are at an early stage of development. This session welcomes contributions towards filling this gaps. Researches and case studies on ex-post and ex-ante flood damage assessment are welcome, with particular attention on works exploring the variety of exposed elements and the different spatial scales which are significant for risk mitigation. Implementation of damage models to the evaluation of risk mitigation actions are also welcome.

Proposed and coordinated by: Kathleen White, Climate Preparedness and Resilience Community of Practice, US Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters, Alexandria, VA, U.S.A. Email: Kathleen.D.White@usace.army.mil

Recent science efforts have made progress in characterizing and understanding compound events and correlated extremes because of their importance in coastal, fluvial, and pluvial flooding in flooding. This session will include presentations that describe historic and contemporary events, illustrate links between flood and drought, and introduce evidence on precursors that could inform flood risk reduction measures. National and international experts will highlight important components and consequences of these events.

Proposed and coordinated by: Giacomo Teruggi, Climate and Water Department, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. Email: gteruggi@wmo.int

Risk assessment, proper planning and mitigation are the cornerstones of any National Meteorological and Hydrological Service (NMHS) measure to reduce flood risks. Timely forecasts/warnings must be produced at regional/national/local levels and communicated through appropriate authorities. Current tools for prevention, mitigation and forecasting must incorporate important ancillary data and a thorough understanding of water management and the dynamics of land use. Data and products relevant for flood risk assessment and management should be provided to relevant stakeholders.

Proposed and coordinated by: Jos van Alphen, Delta Program Commissioner, The Hague, The Netherlands. Email: jos.van.alphen@deltacommissaris.nl

The last decades the rate of sea level rise (SLR) is increasing, and there are indications that an acceleration can occur the second half of this century due to gradual collapse of Antarctica land ice shield. This accelerated SLR might threaten hundreds of millions inhabitants of coastal communities worldwide. Planning and implementation of new strategies and measures takes many decades and should start in time. On the other hand, there is still much uncertainty about CO2 emissions, global warming, land ice behavior and SLR. In this special session recent insights on potential accelerated SLR are presented and discussed, indicative results are presented how this might affect coastal areas, and potential strategies are presented.

Proposed and coordinated by: Kathleen White, Climate Preparedness and Resilience Community of Practice, US Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. U.S.A. Email: Kathleen.D.White@usace.army.mil

The floods of 2019 in the U.S. have presented challenges to local, state, and federal decision-makers and flood risk management professionals. Some locations have experienced flood levels for many months, while others have been affected by recurring or correlated flood events, or flood exacerbated by the wildfires of 2017 and 2018. This session invites presentations relating to the US floods of 2019, including characteristics, consequences, performance of risk reduction measures (including expedient measures), attribution, and planning for resilience. Special focus will be on the lessons learned from these events, including infrastructure performance and reliability, innovative approaches and changing paradigms.

Proposed and coordinated by: Kathleen White, Climate Preparedness and Resilience Community of Practice, US Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters, Alexandria, VA. U.S.A. Email: Kathleen.D.White@usace.army.mil

Observed changes in hydrology and sea level impact flood risk management in different ways. Since preparedness is much more cost effective than response and recovery – estimates ranging from 6 to 12 times more efficient – the appropriate application of climate preparedness and resilience measures is increasing in importance. Effective planning and implementation of these measures requires multidisciplinary approaches by economists, social scientists, and engineers. This session invites presentations about near-term and far-term climate preparedness and resilience planning and implementation and lessons learned.

Proposed and coordinated by: Subhankar Karmakar, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, India; Subimal Ghosh, Centre for Urban Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, India;  P. P. Mujumdar, Interdisciplinary Centre for Water Research, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India. Emails:  skarmakar@iitb.ac.in; subimal.ghosh@gmail.com, pradeep@iisc.ac.in

South Asia, the most populated tropical region of the globe, has experienced significant number of floods in the present decade. For instance, urban floods in Indian cities such as Chennai (2015), Mumbai (2017), Bengaluru (2017), riverine floods in Kerala, India (2018), catastrophic monsoon floods in Bangladesh (2015, 2017), and flash floods over the Himalayas almost every year. These regions are highly vulnerable to flood and thus face significant economic damage and irrevocable human loss. Many of these recently occurred floods are not only attributable to changing climate and geomorphology, but also to human interventions such as changing patterns of land use land cover, urbanization, deforestation, encroachment in wetlands, etc. With this backdrop, under the ICFM 8 main conference theme of Science & Technology for Flood Risk Management, the proposed session will focus on understanding the drivers of mega-flood events in South Asia, development of flood models specific to Urban Floods, Himalayan Floods, Coastal Floods, Riverine Floods etc., development of integrated expert flood forecasting system, flood mitigation strategies, and prioritizing strategies that result in quick recovery. The aim of this session will be to enable a focused discussion amongst the scientific community to rationalize planning strategies for reducing flood risk over South Asia.

Proposed & coordinated by: Toshio Koike,  International Flood Initiative, International Center for Water Hazard and Risk Management, Tsukuba,  Japan. Email: koike@icharm.org

The number of hydrological and meteorological disasters is increasing rapidly all over the world by more than three times during the past forty years in both developed and developing countries. Human factors that increase exposure and vulnerability, such as poverty, rapid population growth, disorderly urbanization and changes in land use together with effects of climate change on weather patterns with increased extreme events, aggravate the negative consequences of flood hazards. Floods derail sustainable development, particularly in developing countries. Consequently, the need to embed flood disaster risk reduction into sustainable development goals is paramount. This special session focuses on the national and international policy approaches of flood risk reduction.

Proposed and coordinated by: Giacomo Teruggi, Climate and Water Department, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. Email: gteruggi@wmo.int

This session is intended to share lessons identified from scientific and societal findings related to flood management, in the framework of projects implemented by International Organizations (IO). Every IO searches formally or informally for good and bad lessons (especially bad ones) from its past activities in order to improve efficiency, effectiveness, organizational image, or the financial bottom line. Building on past similar experiences, this session will tackle the latest findings and shortcomings from internationally led projects in flood management.

Proposed and coordinated by: Bob Beduhn, America’s Watershed Initiative, Email: bob.beduhn@hdrinc.com

America’s Watershed Initiative (AWI) is a collaboration working with hundreds of business, government, academic, and civic organizations to find solutions for the challenges of managing the Mississippi River and the more than 250 rivers that flow into it.  The threats from floods can increase significantly when watersheds lose their natural capacity to store water, when communities and other permanent structures are developed in flood-prone areas, when there are changes in the landscape that cause increased surface water runoff, and when infrastructure—such as levees and dams originally built to manage flood risk—begin to age or are not adequately maintained. Presentations in this session will focus on the impacts of floods on the seven key topics within AWI’s scorecard of the Mississippi River Basin, namely:  recreation, ecosystems, flood control and risk reduction, transportation, water supply, economy and energy.

Proposed and coordinated by: Thomas Richardson, US Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Email: thomas.w.richardson@jsums.edu

Transitioning research into practice is essential to addressing the escalating impacts of flooding in our communities.  This session will highlight the real experiences of applying new technologies and science to make communities more resilient.   From tools that help individuals to those that help manage our nation’s water infrastructure, the practitioners in this session will share their challenges and successes in applying new concepts to improve flood resilience.  The topics will include an app to help individuals buy flood resilient homes, using sensor technologies as part of a country-wide risk reduction system, imbedding resilience into community planning guidance, applying the science of atmospheric rivers for more accurate reservoir control and the complications of measuring resilience.

Proposed and coordinated by: Kathleen White, Climate Preparedness and Resilience Community of Practice, US Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters, Alexandria, VA, U.S.A. Email: Kathleen.D.White@usace.army.mil

The effectiveness of climate preparedness and resilience activities can be enhanced by leveraging the diverse missions, operations, and experiences of interagency and international teams. This session seeks presentations providing examples of interagency efforts such as the National Mitigation Investment Strategy and the Silver Jackets Teams in the US and their analogs elsewhere, as well as those highlighting the benefits of international teaming, multi-disciplinary approaches and effective risk communication methods.

Proposed and coordinated by: Herman van der Most and Kathryn Roscoe, Deltares, Delft, The Netherlands and Emails: Herman.vanderMost@deltares.nl; kathryn.roscoe@deltares.nl

Extreme climatic events have devastating impacts on communities. The interruption of critical infrastructure such as electricity, communication, drinking water or transport systems have cascading impacts that lead to significant economic losses and loss of life. This session focuses on innovative methods and practical applications that assess and improve the resilience of critical infrastructure to extreme events. We invite studies focused on both planning (designing risk-mitigating actions and measures) and on emergency management during an event.